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Jun 14, 2013

Ride To Work Day Is Monday, June 17

American Motorcyclist Association salutes riders who commute on Ride to Work Day, June 17

PICKERINGTON, Ohio -- The American Motorcyclist Association is encouraging all motorcyclists to demonstrate the practical benefits of commuting on a motorcycle on Monday, June 17, in celebration of Motorcycle and Scooter Ride to Work Day.

"Motorcyclists know that motorcycles are fun to ride as well as an economical way to transport yourself from one point to another, and Ride to Work Day is a great way for us to demonstrate that to other road users en masse," said AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman. "AMA members ride responsibly and, with the summer riding season upon us, it's a good time to exercise safe riding practices and to urge that other motorists be aware of motorcyclists on our roads and highways."

Started in 1992, Ride to Work Day is now an international event, with participation in cities around the world and recognition by the federal government and local governments in the United States. For millions of workers, motorcycles and scooters are an economical, efficient and socially responsible form of mobility that save energy, protect the environment and provide a broad range of other public benefits.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Transportation Department, more than 80 million cars and light trucks are used for daily commuting on American roads, and about 200,000 motorcycles and scooters are a regular part of this mix. On Ride to Work Day, the practical side of riding becomes more visible as a large number of America's motorcycles are ridden to work. An estimated 1 million riders will become two- and three-wheeled commuters to help demonstrate that riding is a pragmatic and beneficial form of personal transportation.

Andy Goldfine, a key organizer of the annual Ride to Work Day, said: "Motorcycles and scooters consume less resources per mile than automobiles, and take up less space in parking areas and on roads. Riders seek employer and community support for this efficient form of transportation, and more government and public awareness about riding's many benefits."

For more information about Motorcycle and Scooter Ride to Work Day, visit www.ridetowork.org .

About the American Motorcyclist Association
Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world's largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders' interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com .




More, from a press release issued by Motorcycle Industry Council:

Motorcycle Industry Council Supports 22nd Annual Ride to Work Day

IRVINE, Calif., June 14, 2013 – The Motorcycle Industry Council is once again supporting Ride to Work Day, returning on Monday June 17 for the 22nd straight year to increase public awareness for motorcycling and promote two-wheel transportation that benefits the environment, traffic and parking, and also helps to make commuting more enjoyable.

For the second consecutive year, the MIC obtained an official proclamation for Ride to Work Day from the City of Santa Monica, a major Southern California municipality along the coast. The MIC is suggesting that its staff choose the long route to their Irvine Calif. and Arlington, Va. offices on Monday in order to be seen enjoying their fun and economical rides to work.

“Ride to Work Day is a special day each year to note and promote the benefits of two-wheel commuting, not just for the rider, but for every motorist,” said MIC President Tim Buche. “Riding instead of driving helps relieve traffic, opens up parking spaces, saves fuel and it’s just more fun. If you already ride to work every day, encourage others to try it. If you own a business, help out a riding employee by encouraging more riding time.”

MIC surveys have found that more Americans are tending to use motorcycles and scooters for practical, economical forms for transportation, not just recreation. The latest MIC data showed that there were more than 11 million motorcycles in use in the U.S. operated by more than 27 million riders. Total annual miles traveled by motorcyclists rose from 8.7 billion in 1990 to 29 billion in 2009.

“It’s possible for a motorcycle or scooter rider to get double or even triple the fuel economy of four-wheel vehicles around them in traffic,” said Ty van Hooydonk, communications director for the MIC. “As people are looking to save money these days, those lower fuel costs, lower purchase price, lower insurance and registration fees all add up to thousands of dollars of savings for riders.”

The Motorcycle Industry Council exists to preserve, protect and promote motorcycling through government relations, communications and media relations, statistics and research, aftermarket programs, development of data communications standards, and activities surrounding technical and regulatory issues. As a not-for-profit, national industry association, the MIC seeks to support motorcyclists by representing manufacturers, distributors, dealers and retailers of motorcycles, scooters, ATVs, ROVs, motorcycle/ATV/ROV parts, accessories and related goods and services, and members of allied trades such as insurance, finance and investment companies, media companies and consultants.

The MIC is headquartered in Irvine, Calif., with a government relations office in metropolitan Washington, D.C. First called the MIC in 1970, the organization has been in operation since 1914. Visit the MIC at www.mic.org