Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Inducts 16

Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Inducts 16

© 2002, Roadracing World Publishing, Inc.

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From a press release:

MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME INDUCTS CLASS OF 2002

PICKERINGTON, OHIO — The Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum has announced that sixteen legendary figures in the history of American motorcycling were inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame today, during ceremonies at the Museum in Pickerington, Ohio.

The Motorcycle Hall of Fame recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to motorcycling, including those known for their contributions to road riding, off-road riding and all categories of racing, as well as those who have excelled in business, history, design and engineering.

The new inductees join 269 others already enshrined in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, located on the lower level of the Museum. The Motorcycle Hall of Fame features a plaque recognizing each inductee, along with related motorcycles, photos and memorabilia.

This year’s class includes racers, stunt riders, engineers, media figures, and everyday riders who became pioneers. Among the notables: Doug Domokos, aka “The Wheelie King,” the best-known stunt rider of the 1980s and 1990s; Freddie Marsh, who began short-course racing and hill-climbing in 1924, continued racing until age 88 (now 102); Bessie Stringfield, who broke down barriers for women and African-Americans in the 1940s, completing eight solo cross-country tours and serving as a U.S. Army motorcycle dispatch rider; and Sylvester Roper, American inventor and transportation pioneer who built a steam-powered motorcycle in
1869.

“We see the Motorcycle Hall of Fame as an important part of the Museum’s mission,” said Don Emde, chairman of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, which runs the facility. “Preserving the heritage of American motorcycling means more than displaying a collection of classic machines. It means keeping alive the memory of those who built that heritage.”

Emde, winner of the 1972 Daytona 200, is a Hall-of-Famer himself, as is his father, Floyd, who won the same event in 1948.

Any motorcycling enthusiast may submit a person to be considered for induction into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame; complete biographical information should accompany the submission. Inductees are chosen by six committees consisting of Hall-of-Famers and independent experts in various disciplines. The Motorcycle Hall of Fame Class of 2003 will be announced next May.


THE MOTORCYCLE HALL OF FAME CLASS OF 2002

Russ Darnell – Motocross pioneer, helped shape the sport when it came to the U.S. in the late 1960s.

Will Davis – Seventh in career AMA Grand National wins, five-time champion of MARS Motorcycle Asphalt Racing Series.

Marty Dickerson – Road racer, Vincent dealer, set world speed records in 1953 and 1955.

Doug Domokos – “The Wheelie King,” best-known stunt rider of the 1980s and 1990s.

Ed Fisher – Racer, tuner, dealer, life-long enthusiast, winner of 1953 Laconia 100.

Jeff Fredette – “Mr. ISDT/ISDE,” won ten gold and ten silver medals, U.S. National Enduro winner.

Lars Larsson – 13-time ISDT/ISDE competitor, won multiple gold medals, among the first Swedish motocrossers to make his mark in the U.S., first Husqvarna factory rider in the U.S.

Walt Mahony – Motorcycle-racing photographer for 39 years, took more than 435,000 photos, printed more than 1 million images for racers, fans and
publications.

Freddie Marsh – Began short-course racing and hill-climbing in 1924, continued hill-climbing until age 88 (now age 102), dealer for Indian and Moto Guzzi.

Reg Pridmore – AMA Superbike National Champion in 1976, 1977 and 1978, founder of CLASS Motorcycle Schools.

Sylvester Roper – American inventor and transportation pioneer who built a steam-powered motorcycle in 1869.

Donny Schmit – Won seven AMA Motocross Nationals, 1992 250cc World Champion, 1990 125cc World Motocross Champion, 1986 125cc Western Supercross Champion.

Dale Singleton – “The Flying Pig Farmer,” won the Daytona 200 in 1979 and 1981.

Bessie Stringfield – In the 1940s, “The Motorcycle Queen of Miami” broke down barriers for women and African American motorcyclists at the same time, completing eight solo cross-country tours and serving as a U.S. Army motorcycle dispatch rider.

Adeline and Augusta Van Buren – These sisters’ 1916 cross-country ride proved to the U.S. military that women were fit to serve as dispatch riders. The Van Burens were the first women to make the transcontinental journey on two solo motorcycles.

The goal of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, located on the campus of the American Motorcyclist Association in Pickerington, Ohio, is to tell the stories and preserve the history of motorcycling. The Motorcycle Hall of Fame honors those who have contributed notably to the sport, and three major exhibition halls showcase the machines and memorabilia that have shaped motorcycling. The Museum is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; noon to 4 p.m. on Memorial Day,
Independence Day and Labor Day; and closed on New Year’s, Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Adult admission is $4 per person; ages 17 and under are admitted free. For more information, call (614) 856-2222, or visit the Museum’s website at www.motorcyclemuseum.org.

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