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Jul 10, 2001

Motorcycle Hall Of Fame Museum Opens Indian Exhibit

On Saturday the AMA-affiliated Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum opened a new exhibit on Indian motorcycles. The following text is from an AMA press release on the opening of the exhibit, which is officially known as A Century of Indian, presented by Progressive Motorcycle Insurance:<BR><BR>This exhibit, the most ambitious in the museum's 11-year history, commemorates the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company.<BR><BR>The exhibit officially opened during ribbon-cutting ceremonies held this afternoon (July 7) at the museum. In attendance were several hundred motorcycle enthusiasts, local officials, and many of the men and women who rode Indian motorcycles during the first half of the 20th century. Also on hand were classic motorcycles from the "Century Ride Home," a 15-day ride from Los Angeles, California, to Springfield, Massachusetts (original home of the Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company).<BR><BR>The new Indian exhibit celebrates one American motorcycling's most heralded brands. It features 50 important motorcycles from Indian's tumultuous history, as well as period sales literature, memorabilia, photos never before displayed, and informative text that chronicles the rise and fall of an American icon.<BR><BR>"Indian remains one of the true touchstones of American motorcycling, as well as a fascinating study in American business," said Mark Mederski, Executive Director of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum. "The museum is proud to present an exhibit that not only showcases classic motorcycles, but also documents the people, events and cultural context surrounding the Indian saga."<BR><BR>Ed Youngblood, the exhibit's curator, agreed. "Our goal has been to create an exhibit that can be enjoyed by everyone--from motorcycle enthusiasts to history buffs; from business majors to school-age children. The array of rare and beautiful motorcycles can be appreciated in their own right, of course, but we also present the intriguing story of the Indian brand, in a way that brings the legend to life."<BR><BR> Progressive Motorcycle Insurance, the exhibit's presenting sponsor, is well-known for insuring more motorcycles than any other American carrier. But the company is also committed to preserving motorcycling's heritage.<BR><BR>"Progressive is proud of its long-standing commitment to motorcyclists," said Ben Sheridan, General Manager of Special Lines for Progressive Insurance.<BR><BR>"Our customers tell us that history is important to their sport. As the presenting sponsor of 'A Century of Indian,' Progressive Motorcycle Insurance is pleased to do its part to preserve that history."<BR><BR>Motorcycles in the exhibit represent the entire history of the Indian marque -- from a 1905 Lightweight Single to a 1961 Royal Enfield Chief. The most contemporary Indians on display are a 1969 Velo 500 designed by industry legend Floyd Clymer, and a 1998 Chief produced by the new Indian Motorcycle Company of Gilroy, California.<BR><BR>"A Century of Indian, presented by Progressive Motorcycle Insurance" will be open through December 2002. An accompanying 200-page, lavishly illustrated catalog of the exhibit will go on sale this fall.<BR><BR>The goal of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, located on the campus of the American Motorcyclist Association in Pickerington, Ohio, is to tell the stories and preserve the history of motorcycling. The Motorcycle Hall of Fame honors those who have contributed notably to the sport, and three major exhibition halls showcase the machines and memorabilia that have shaped motorcycling. For more information, call (614) 856-2222, or visit the Museum's website at www.motorcyclemuseum.org.<BR><BR>The Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum and this exhibit are not sponsored or endorsed by Indian Motorcycle Company, and these two entities are not affiliated in any way. The use of the Indian designs are for historical purposes only and should not be construed as endorsements of or promotions for Indian Motorcycles.