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Apr 10, 2013

Isle Of Man Government Names Parts Of TT Course After McGuinness, Molyneux

Isle of Man TT racer John McGuinness. Photo courtesy of Isle of Man TT Press Office.
JOHN McGUINNESS AND DAVE MOLYNEUX IMMORTALISED IN TT HISTORY WITH THEIR OWN NAMED SECTIONS OF THE COURSE

TT organisers have taken the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of today's two most successful competitors, John McGuinness and Dave Molyneux by naming locations on the Mountain Course after each of them.

The pair will be following some of the most illustrious names in TT history by having corners named after them. The newly named course points come as the Isle of Man Government has redesigned and replaced the existing directional boards and mile markers around the 37 mile course.

John McGuinness first competed on the Isle of Man in 1996 and to date has 19 race victories to his name, including two last year. He is also the outright lap record holder with a lap of (131.578mph) which he set in the 2009 meeting.

Isle of Man born Dave Molyneux has won sixteen sidecar races including winning both sidecar races in 2012 with his current passenger Patrick Farrance. He first competed in 1985, winning his first race in 1989.

The illustrious duo will be following in the wheel-tracks of some of the greatest names in motorcycling history to have sections of the course named after them including Giacomo Agostini, Geoff Duke, Jimmy Guthrie, Mike Hailwood and Joey Dunlop. The new signs that are named after famous TT riders also feature some individual artwork that reflects the rider's iconography.

John's point of the course, which will now be known as 'McGuinness's' is at 'Shoughlaigue' which is the fast run down from Handley's Corner before the top of Barregarrow. It is his favourite part of the course and one where he believes he can gain time on his rivals. 'McGuinness's' will feature John's infamous voodoo artwork that has adorned his helmets for many years. Dave's corner is the fast right-hander at the end of Cronk-y-Voddy straight and will now be called 'Molyneux's'. As the most successful local competitor by some distance, Molyneux's will be also be represented by the Island's three legs.

The new directional signs retain the now iconic orange background but importantly include some new features. Fans will immediately spot the large TT logo that tops all the signs, and the new versions also incorporate the famous Mountain Course name along with a retro-inspired chequered board pattern that reflects the event's long heritage. In addition, each section of course featured is now a more accurate depiction of the road ahead, thanks to assistance provided by the Isle of Man Government's Department of Infrastructure.

Fans will have an interesting time spotting those signs that have been radically re-designed, and there are even a few additional signs to be found in more than one popular vantage point. Meanwhile, the original signs that have now been replaced will be available on the auction site ebay together with other memorabilia including the iconic mile markers and the instantly recognisable yellow Shell fuel fillers used up until the mid 1980's. All funds raised from the sale of the items are invested back into the costs associated with running the event.




More, from a press release issued by John McGuinness' publicist:

TT legend McGuinness honoured

Morecambe’s John McGuinness has had his achievements at the Isle of Man TT Races recognised ahead of the 2013 event with a section of the iconic 37 and ¾-mile course named after him.

With 19 wins already to his name, the second highest in total behind Joey Dunlop, the point of the course which will now be known as McGuinness's is at Shoughlaigue, the fast run down from Handley's Corner before the top of Barregarrow.

It’s John’s favourite part of the course and one where he believes he can gain time on his rivals. The corner will now have a new-look sign along with individual artwork to reflect the rider's iconography. The sign at McGuinness’s features the infamous voodoo artwork that has adorned his helmets for many years.

John first competed on the Isle of Man in 1996 and took his first win in the Lightweight 250cc race three years later, the year he also became British Champion. He has now racked up a staggering 19 race victories, including two at last year’s event, and 36 podiums as well as being the outright lap record holder with a lap of 131.578mph, which he set in 2009.

Speaking about the honour, a delighted John commented: “It’s an absolute honour and I was pretty speechless when the organisers told me about the idea. It’s the most famous circuit in the world and you grow up watching the greats who go on to have corners named after them and now I‘m sitting here with a corner named after me, it doesn’t get much better than that. I was close to tears when I was standing by the sign today and what’s particularly nice is that it breaks a tradition and honours a current rider.”

“The corner I chose is one that always gives me a special thrill when I ride my bike through it. You never see many people watching there and some people might not even have given it much thought but it’s part of the course I love to ride through. It’s a high speed, 6th gear corner, and probably 180 mph on a Superbike, which, when you go through it in a car, you wouldn’t think would be possible. It’s a fantastic sequence of bends and the last left opens up lovely so you can get a good run down to Barregarrow. It’s a bit of a childhood dream to have part of the course named after you and for generations to come it will always be called McGuinness’s.”

Fellow TT competitor Dave Molyneux has also had a corner named after him, the Manxman having won 16 sidecar races since his debut in 1985. This is the highest total recorded by a sidecar competitor and the third overall behind Dunlop and McGuinness. The newly named corner, the fast right-hander at the end of Cronk-y-Voddy straight, will now be called Molyneux's.

The pair join other great names from motorcycling history in having sections of the course named after them, including Giacomo Agostini, Geoff Duke, Jimmy Guthrie, Mike Hailwood and Dunlop.