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Mar 23, 2011

AMA Video Contest Will Put "Real Face" On Effects Of CPSIA Lead Ban On Youth Recreational Vehicles

PICKERINGTON, Ohio -- The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) continues its ongoing fight to change a misguided law that will effectively ban the sale of kids' dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) at the end of the year. The Kids Just Want to Ride! video contest will empower those most impacted by the law by helping them tell Congress just how important motorcycling is to them.

"There is no one better to articulate the importance of riding with your family than the very kids who will be impacted by the unintended consequences of this law," said AMA Senior Vice President for Government Relations Ed Moreland. "The Kids Just Want to Ride! video contest will put a real face on the effects of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, which is known as the lead law and threatens the availability of kid-sized motorcycles and ATVs."

The home-made videos will be used to help deliver this important message to lawmakers. The winning video will be a key component of an AMA-organized "AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb" in Washington, D.C., on May 26. The media event and lobbying effort will urge lawmakers to exempt kids' dirtbikes and ATVs from the CPSIA.

"Lawmakers need to understand that these are real kids, and real families, being hurt by the lead law," Moreland said. "This two-pronged approach -- the video contest and the AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb -- will deliver the message that a legislative fix, such as H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, is the best solution to this problem."

For full details concerning the Kids Just Want to Ride! video contest and the AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb, go to AmericanMotorcyclist.com/KidsJustWantToRide.aspx.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part, including kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law, has delayed enforcing key portions until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed by then, the sale of kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs will effectively be banned.

Moreland added that the best way to fix the CPSIA is H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, introduced by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.). The Kids Just Want to Ride Act would exempt kids' dirtbikes and ATVs from the CPSIA.

All motorcyclists, ATV riders and their families are encouraged to attend the AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb. For information to help with their visit, AMA and All-Terrain Vehicle Association members should contact the AMA Grassroots Team at (202) 742-4310 or email grassroots@ama-cycle.org.



About the American Motorcyclist Association
Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle. AMA members come from all walks of life, and they navigate many different routes on their journey to the same destination: freedom on two wheels. As the world's largest motorcycling rights organization, the AMA advocates for motorcyclists' interests in the halls of local, state and federal government, the committees of international governing organizations, and the court of public opinion. Through member clubs, promoters and partners, the AMA sanctions more motorsports competition and motorcycle recreational events than any other organization in the world. AMA members receive money-saving discounts from dozens of well-known suppliers of motorcycle services, gear and apparel, bike rental, transport, hotel stays and more. Through its support of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, the AMA preserves the heritage of motorcycling for future generations. For more information, please visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com.